All 26 seasons of classic Doctor Who finally have a U.S. streaming home

Contributed by
Apr 5, 2017

Until recently, if you wanted to put together a complete (save for the lost episodes) run of classic Doctor Who, you were either in for something tedious, something expensive, or both. Sure, there were lots of DVDs out there, but you either had to buy them all or wait for them to arrive in the mail via services like Netflix on an individual basis.Things got significantly easier a while back when streaming services like Netflix and Hulu started carrying classic episodes, but they were selective and incomplete. It was far from impossible to see every episode, but if you were looking to marathon the whole thing, it was a bit of a chore (apart from the general time commitment of watching 26 years of television, I mean).

Last year, the BBC pulled classic Who episodes from Netflix and Hulu, and word began to spread the reason was an impending BBC streaming service for U.S. fans who just can't get enough U.K. TV. Last month, BBC and ITV launched that streaming service, called BritBox, with loads of classic programming, but no Doctor Who. Now, at last, they've remedied that.

As of this week, all 26 seasons and all seven Doctors who lived them are available to stream on BritBox, along with some extras like The Doctors Revisited series that aired for the show's 50th anniversary in 2013. The episodes are all rather neatly categorized, broken down chronologically by Doctor, but there are also collections of episodes focusing on specific monsters and allies, and even guides for new viewers. So, if you wanted to set up that perfect weekend Dalek marathon, now you can. Plus, according to Variety, the service also plans to add audio of the lost Who episodes, so you can get as close to the complete run as possible until someone finds that footage in a basement somewhere.

BritBox charges $6.99 a month for their U.K TV archive, which also includes classics like Red Dwarf and Fawlty Towers. If you're not sure about the purchase and you just want to tinker around a bit, there's also a seven-day free trial. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm off to finally stream "The Pirate Planet," as fellow Syfy Wire writer Dany Roth has frequently assured me I should.