Bill & Ted’s William Sadler says ‘Yes, Way!’ to reprising Death for Bill & Ted: Face the Music

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Feb 20, 2018

We’re not ashamed to admit just how non, non, non-excellent it is that it’s taking so long for Bill & Ted 3 to happen, despite most of the original cast and creative team being totally into it. But recently, it seems there’s been a noticeable uptick in buzz surrounding the long-brewing sequel—including, now, the confirmed interest of the Grim Reaper himself.

Answering a Twitter shout from Bill & Ted co-creator and writer Ed Solomon, William Sadler—one of the second film’s highlights as the wry, ever-exasperated incarnation of Death himself—said he’s definitely ready to jump, if development on the third movie does get underway.


social-mediaAs you can tell  from Solomon’s tweet, the script for the third film was written with Sadler firmly in mind. As for a title, Keanu Reeves revealed at 2017’s New York Comic Con that the movie will be called Bill & Ted: Face the Music

Face the Music reportedly will focus on Bill and Ted in middle age, now married and living a passionless middle class life, with the plot reintroducing them to the music they once chased with such heedless enthusiasm—back when they were just a couple of idiots from San Dimas with unswerving faith that their totally tubular metal band, Wyld Stallyns, could save the world through radical tunes. Reeves called the story a “cautionary tale” about allowing life to get in the way of your dreams. 

Solomon has said that most studios want to reboot the franchise with younger actors, instead of iterating on Reeves’ and Alex Winter’s original characters. But with seemingly everybody on board for Bill & Ted 3including director Dean Parisot and Steven Soderberg as a co-producer—it’s most, most heinous that a studio has yet to step forward and lock the movie down.

With so much recent buzz from different corners of the Bill & Ted universe, we’re optimistic that bodacious news of the film’s development green light is just around the corner. If this movie doesn’t get made, well, that’d be righteously bogus.