David Tennant calls Good Omens a 'fairy tale' set in the real world

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Feb 21, 2018

Excitement continues to mount for Neil Gaiman's adaptation of the book he famously co-wrote with the late Terry PratchettGood Omens. The upcoming Amazon miniseries is still filming, and though Gaiman continues to post tantalizing glimpses from the set, actor David Tennant (who will play Crowley in the series) has started to ramp up the excitement himself. 

Talking with the The Herald, Tennant revealed that he is "rather excited" about the new show, and that a look at a new sizzle reel had a fair amount to do with it. Admitting that the tone of the book is a hard thing to pin down, he makes it clear that Gaiman has adapted his own co-written book quite faithfully. The actor who so ingeniously played the 10th Doctor on Doctor Who went on to say, "I think it's quite unlike anything I've ever been in before and possibly anything many people have seen before." 

Teasing the show, Tennant likened it to "a sort of fairy tale with a kind of very real world setting. It's a farce and it's also deeply serious." He went on to say that though it is both of these things, it's not "quite any one of them." According to him, if the show ends up like the sizzle reel that he's seen, then it's going to be "quite special." 

We would certainly hope so. Any Gaiman adaptation is cause for excitement, but this isn't just Gaiman's world being adapted — it's Pratchett's world as well. Gaiman is showrunning the entire thing himself, and the cast (including Tennant, Michael Sheen, Jon Hamm, and more) is fantastic. 

Tennant and Sheen are set to share a fair amount of screentime. As Crowley, Tennant will devilishly play to the fiendish side of the audience, but it is Sheen as the angel Aziraphale who will appeal to our better natures. They are a classic pair in the book, and Tennant gives every indication that they will be a classic pair on the screen. 

The two actors have been in the same project before, but have never shared any actual moments together. Finally working with someone whom he's known for so long meant that Tennant could finally "tick a box" that he had been hoping to tick, as the actor says himself.

The enormity of this production isn't lost on Tennant, either, who mentioned that the Amazon streaming model (combined with the resources of the BBC) has him working on a larger scale than he's used to. Along with that, he noted that there is a "palpable sense of ambition and expectation" running through the entire enterprise.

The show is now tentatively set to stream on Amazon next year, but in the meantime, we can hope that Crowley, Aziraphale, and maybe even Gaiman himself might show us a bit of the sizzle reel that Tennant mentions. When the 10th Doctor gets excited, we get excited in return — and Tennant's words of gleeful anticipation are a very good omen indeed.