Negasonic Teenage Warhead and Yukio

Even in the age of superhero diversity, GLAAD finds LGBTQ representation lacking

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May 22, 2018

With the recent success of Wonder Woman and Black Panther, it’s easy to think we might be in a Golden Age of representation, but according to GLAAD, there are still plenty of folks being left out.

The advocacy group just released its sixth annual GLAAD Studio Responsibility Index measuring the “quantity, quality and diversity” of LGBTQ people in films released by the seven major studios during the 2017 calendar year. And guess what? This is the worst year of the report yet, with not one studio garnering better than an “insufficient” rating. 

“With wildly successful films like Wonder Woman and Black Panther proving that audiences want to see diverse stories that haven’t been told before, there is simply no reason for major studios to have such low scores on the Studio Responsibility Index,” said Sarah Kate Ellis GLAAD president and CEO in a statement. 

According to the report, 14 of the 109 major studio films in 2017 included an LGBTQ character. If you’re doing the math, that’s just 12.8 percent. And instead of making headway, the major studios are moving backwards, falling 5.6 percentage points from the prior year.  

The report also assigned each of the major studios a grade for their LGBTQ representation, and not one of them received a “good” or “excellent” rating. 20th Century Fox and Universal each merited “insufficient” ratings; Paramount, Sony, and Disney received “poor” marks; and Lionsgate and Warner Bros. failed hardest with “failing” grades.

Further helping to bring those scores down, not one studio film last year included a transgender character. Not one.  

But there is hope, as the report mentions that 2018 is already off to a good start with Annihilation, Blockers, and Love, Simon all seeing positive LGBTQ representation. And just last week, GLAAD came out in support of Deadpool 2’s lesbian superheroes Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand) and Yukio (Shioli Kutsuna).

But there’s still much work to be done in the field. According to Ellis: “At a time when the entertainment industry is holding much-needed discussions about inclusion, now is the time to ensure the industry takes meaningful action and incorporates LGBTQ stories and creators as among priorities areas for growing diversity.”

(via EW)