If the Mayans were right, it was probably about Internet comments

Contributed by
May 15, 2012
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A little while back, I was at Utah State University to give a public talk about the threat from asteroid impacts and what we can do to stop them (PLUG ALERT: if you want me to come talk at your venue, my agent would love to hear from you).

While I was there I was interviewed by Utah Public Radio, and that interview is online.

I was also chatted up by the local TV station, KSL. I think it went OK, and they put it online as well:


[You may have to refresh this page to get the video to load.]

While I rather wish I had stated succinctly that even the basis of the "Mayan 2012 doomsday" nonsense is itself a gross misinterpretation of Mayan history, culture, and calendar, I think I was pretty clear. I have to walk a fine line sometimes: debunking crap doomsday scenarios like 2012 while also warning of real dangers like asteroid impacts... while neither over- or understating that danger. It's a delicate balance.

A balance, I'll note, which is apparently completely lost on some of the commenters on the KSL website who are saying I'm totally wrong and that the doomsday is coming in December [Note: I checked just before posting this, and most of the really over-the-top comments have been deleted, and I thank the forum moderators for that]. The sheer blind eye some have toward reality is stunning.

I know some people have deep beliefs they hold true, and are willing to deny what's right in front of their face if they have to. I also know it's the Internet out there, where people don't read past the first line or watch a video past the first few seconds. Still, the denial and -- to be blunt -- dickery is breathtaking. One person actually said they hoped the Universe kills me so they don't have to listen to my "drivel" [that was one of the comments deleted, BTW].

Of course this isn't the first time I've had someone wish me dead, or that I'd shut up. Duh. But what I find fascinating is the irony. One complaint I hear about critical thinking is that it takes away hope, takes away beauty, and replaces them with despair and the ugly nature of reality. And yet here we see people shredding their critical thinking to hold fast to a doomsday scenario that is as ugly as it is hopeless.

If they actually applied a bit of skepticism, they'd see the 2012 doomsday garbage for what it is. But they cleave unto it as fervently as a drowning man to a life preserver.

I don't think I have anything particularly profound to add to this; I'm just shining a light on it for you to see. Be aware of this, and always remember people's ability to be paradoxical and completely embrace a nonsensical danger while denying the real one.


Related Posts:

- Re-cycled Mayan calendar nonsense
- My asteroid impact talk is now on TED! - MSNBC interview: 2012, the year the Earth doesn’t end. Again.
- Betelgeuse and 2012
- Giant spaceships to attack December 2012?
- No, a pole shift won’t cause global superstorms