Logan director James Mangold on why the movie takes place in 2029

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Jan 20, 2017

While we knew James Mangold's upcoming Wolverine sequel Logan took place in a bleak future set after the epilogue of X-Men: Days of Future Past, the movie's exact date was still being kept under wraps. Today the director not only revealed when the movie is set but also explained why he chose the year 2029 for Logan's (supposedly) final story.

Long story short about Logan, mutants are a dying breed because of a virus, an aging Professor X is losing his memory, and everyone’s favorite Canadian mutant is on the booze, with his healing powers on the fritz. Young mutants are being kidnapped and turned into weapons, and a band of mutant-hating cyborgs are scouring the land.

See? BLEAK.

In a new interview with the good folks at Comic Book following the premiere of the movie's final trailer(s), Mangold clarified that the movie loosely based on Mark Millar's Old Man Logan storyline from the Marvel comics actually takes place in 2029 and explained why he chose to set the film roughly six years after Days of Future Past's hopeful epilogue.

"It's the year 2029 when the movie takes place. There's an epilogue scene in Days of Future Past which is 2024, or 2023, something like that," Mangold said. "I just wanted to get far enough past. My goal was real simple: it was to pick a time where I had enough elbow room that I was clear of existing entanglements. Part of the way I think these films stop being fresh ['these films' being franchise comic book movies] is when you find yourself making essentially a television series with $200 million episodes where you're literally just picking up where the last one left off and you're making a mini-series. Then, it's impossible to do something fresh, meaning essentially you're just a director on the 14th episode of a television show picking up where the last one left off and people are going to be really startled by any discontinuity or changes."

Since Logan is part of 20th Century Fox's X-Men Cinematic Universe, James Mangold wanted to free himself from the wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey aspect of the X-Men timeline that can definitely give a massive headache to the best of us.

"The goal here was to somehow make a film that's different: to be a filmmaker myself and go, 'How would I bring myself to this? What would I do if I was starting from scratch? What would I explore? What have I seen not explored?' Not only in the X-Men universe but in comic book movies in general.”

Logan opens on March 3. 

(via Comic Book)