So what does Neil deGrasse Tyson think of Interstellar's sci-fi science?

Contributed by
Nov 11, 2014

Neil deGrasse Tyson is the Internet's favorite physicist/meme, so what does he make of Christopher Nolan’s ambitious sci-fi epic Interstellar?

Tyson doesn’t often offer his opinion on the actual quality of films, but he does like chiming in about how they portray science on the screen. Considering he’s acclaimed in his field, he has the credentials to do just that.

Tyson took to Twitter to fire off a flurry of messages about the film, digging into several different scientific elements of the script and how it worked in relation to real scientific theory. It turns out he was fairly impressed with Interstellar’s science — though, admittedly, he doesn’t go too deep into that ending (we’ll stop there for fear of spoilers).

Check out Tyson’s tweets below and let us know what you thought of the film:

In #Interstellar: All leading characters, including McConaughey, Hathaway, Chastain, & Caine play a scientist or engineer.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: There’s a robot named KIPP. One of the Executive Producers, a physicist, is named Kip. I’m just saying.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: And in the real universe, strong gravitational fields measurably slow passage of time relative to others.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

GPS satellites, located farther from Earth’s center than we are, keep faster time than do our clocks on Earth’s surface.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

GPS Satellites are pre-corrected for General Relativity, allowing them to beam us the accurate time for Earth’s surface.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: Experience Einstein’s Relativity of Time as no other feature film has shown.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: Experience Einstein's Curvature of Space as no other feature film has shown.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

Relativity. Gravity. Quantum. Electrodynamics. Evolution. Each of these theories is true, whether or not you believe in them.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: The producers knew exactly how, why, & when you’d achieve zero-G in space.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: You observe great Tidal Waves from great Tidal Forces, of magnitude that orbiting a Black Hole might create

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: You enter a 3-Dimensional portal in space. Yes, you can fall in from any direction. Yes, it’s a Worm Hole.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: They reprise the matched-rotation docking maneuver from "2001: A Space Odyssey," but they spin 100x faster.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: Of the leading characters (all of whom are scientists or engineers) half are women. Just an FYI.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: On another planet, around another star, in another part of the galaxy, two guys get into a fist fight.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar, if you didn’t understand the physics, try Kip Thorne’s highly readable Bbook “The Science of Interstellar"

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar, if you didn’t understand the plot, there is no published book to help you.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

REMINDER: Never look to me for opinions on new films. All I do is highlight the science one might or might not find in them.

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

In #Interstellar: They explore a planet near a Black Hole. Personally, I’d stay as far the hell away from BlackHoles as I can

— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) November 10, 2014

Along with the tweet storm, Tyson also showed up on CBS News to talk about the science of Interstellar, and was once again impressed — largely with the way Nolan portrayed scientists as normal folks, as opposed to wild-haired weirdos.

(Via Neil deGrasse Tyson, CBS News)