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Stuff We Love: Marc Hagan Guirey’s Horrorgami and Star Wars-gami

Contributed by
Jan 29, 2018

After this, you’re never going to want to make another paper crane again.

Horrorgami isn’t origami, but kirigami, the Japanese art of cutting and folding paper into silhouetted scenes. Mind-blowing artist and horror fan Marc Hagan-Guirey (aka Paper Dandy) took that concept and worked some dark magic on it. You now need nothing more than a few sheets of paper to recreate scenes that are as intricate as they are unsettling, from Carfax Abbey to the Headless Horseman on his menacing steed to the tentacles of The Thing Under the Stairs.

You’re going to need a knife—no, not the murder weapon kind.

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Credit: Marc Hagan-Guirey 

 

Hagan-Guirey, who has haunted galleries all over the world with his paper nightmares and been commissioned by Samsung Galaxy, Procter Gamble and Decorex International, meticulously designed 20 scenes from horror lit and movies that all come with detailed templates and instructions so you don’t lose any fingers in the process of carving out those writhing tentacles and grinning skulls. That gives me relief since I’ve always been nervous around X-acto knives despite never actually inflicting any accidental injuries on myself.

By the way, it doesn’t stop at Frank-N-Furter’s castle. The artist has gone far beyond that, as in far, far away.

 

Star Wars has also gotten Hagan-Guirey’s kirigami treatment when he first landed on distant planets with his unreal take on the Mos Eisley Cantina, R2-D2-‘s hologram message, the Millennium Falcon, the Death Star and more extragalactic scenes. Of course there’s a book on this.

You can go from Padawan to Jedi as you start at beginner level and eventually blast off to intermediate and advanced, and you don’t need to summon the Force to do it. Though it would be kind of cool if lightsabers actually existed and it was possible to cut out an X-wing with one.

Hyperspace or haunted house? Just get both.