The New Mutants to kick off trilogy of X-Men horror flicks

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Oct 16, 2017

The trailer for Fox's New Mutants, the studio's latest Marvel Comics-inspired film based on the X-Men spinoff characters of the same name, arrived late last week, and it brought a ton of questions.

For one thing, the film is now set up to look like just a straight-up horror movie, but just how much of that will be in the finished product? How did writer/director Josh Boone convince Fox to go so dark with a franchise that's traditionally leaned much more in the direction of superhero adventure? And, of course, if this film is a hit, what happens to the New Mutants after that?

Boone sat down for an interview with IGN after the trailer dropped, and while he couldn't reveal too much, he did clear up a few things, starting with the future of the franchise. Apparently, when New Mutants first arrived as a Fox project, it was conceived as a trilogy of mutant horror films, each one with a different tone.

"These are all going to be horror movies, and they're all be their own distinct kind of horror movies," Boone said. "This is certainly the ‘rubber-reality’ supernatural horror movie. The next one will be a completely different kind of horror movie.

"Our take was just go examine the horror genre through comic book movies and make each one its own distinct sort of horror film. Drawing from the big events that we love in the comics."

Speaking of that "rubber-reality," Boone again confirmed that New Mutants is indeed a straight-up horror film with comic book characters in it, and while it's heavily inspired by the classic "Demon Bear" story (arguably the best New Mutants comic ever), we won't see a direct adaptation.

As for how and why Boone was given the freedom to make an X-Men franchise film as dark as he did, the director credits the dual successes of Deadpool and Logan, both very tonally different from previous X-Men films, for paving the way.

"I mean ... FOX made Deadpool and Logan, and they were sort of so tonally different they felt emboldened to let us go make it different, and make it have its own distinct tone and identity. I think of the mainline X-Men movies more as grand operative science fiction films. This is much more of a performance-driven horror film."

For more from Boone, including practical effects, how the asylum functions in the plot, and the film's connections to the main X-Men universe, head over to IGN.