WATCH: DC Super Hero Girls and Supergirl creative teams on teenage superheroes

Contributed by
Jan 24, 2018

Even superheroes have growing pains. Featuring teenage versions of DC characters Wonder Woman, Supergirl, Batgirl, Poison Ivy, Harley Quinn, Bumblebee, Katana and more, DC Super Hero Girls sees our superheroes and future supervillains-in-the-making attending Super Hero High in Metropolis. There, they not only have to navigate life as teenagers and high schoolers, but also learn to hone their superpowers and abilities.

The same can be said for Eisner Award-winner Mariko Tamaki's comic book series Supergirl: Being Super, which sees a young Kara Danvers growing up in Midvale as a teenager from Krypton living on Earth.

During the recent DC in D.C. 2018 event, SYFY WIRE's Mike Avila had the chance to speak with DC Super Hero Girls writer Shea Fontana and artist Agnes Garbowska, as well as Supergirl writer Tamaki, about the process of making new iterations of the characters we know from the pages of the DC Comics and making them appealing to a younger crowd.

 

"With DC Super Hero Girls we're very conscious of making the character DNA the same as it is in all the DC Comics," said Fontana. "There's a reason that Wonder Woman has been around for 76 years and she is so popular. And we wanted to take those inherent qualities that have made her so loved by all these people throughout the generations but then bring them in into this modern era and really make her pop for a modern audience."

"So it's stripping away a lot of the backstories for our characters like Harley and Ivy and just finding them in this high school time where they’re innocent and they’re new and they’re discovering the world and it’s a really exciting time for all of our characters as it is when you are a high schooler," she added. "Like everything's weird and everybody’s weird even if you’re a superhero."

Dig into our video interview above to find out which medium Garbowska prefers to use for DC Super Hero Girls and the main quality Tamaki admires in the Girl of Steel.

Additional material by Nathalie Caron.