Halo Combat Evolved

World Video Game Hall of Fame 2017 inductees run the gaming gamut

Contributed by
May 5, 2017

Why wouldn't they have a World Video Game Hall of Fame in Rochester, New York?

That's my first question after reading The Hollywood Reporter's story about this year's inductees to the World Video Game HoF, housed out of what sounds like the happiest place in central New York, The Strong National Museum of Play.

My second question is: do the characters in the games get to give acceptance speeches? Because Donkey Kong deserves to be heard. Though Master Chief may come off as kind of a blowhard.

Regardless, I'm happy just knowing that Donkey Kong (1981) and Halo: Combat Evolved (2001) have joined fellow video game gamechangers Pokemon Red and Green (1996), and Street Fighter II (1991) in the Hall of Fame's Class of 2017. Together, they're the third class inducted into the seemingly selective Hall. So selective that this year's group beat out such deserving stalwarts as Final Fantasy VII, Mortal Kombat (which I can't even say without screaming), Resident Evil, and Tomb Raider.

The Hall's intrepid first class of 2015 includes just six titles: Doom, Pac-Man, Pong, Super Mario Bros., Tetris, and World of Warcraft -- which apparently means Robotron wasn't one of the six most important games ever. Nor was it important enough to be included in the the second Class of 2016, comprised of Grand Theft Auto III, The Legend of Zelda, The Oregon Trail, The Sims, Sonic the Hedgehog, and Space Invaders.

All these worthy Hall of Famers represent integral games from various evolutionary eras throughout gaming history, and multiple platforms, too. Which is what the Hall of Fame claims to strive for: to recognize "individual electronic games of all types -- arcade, console, computer, handheld, and mobile -- that have enjoyed popularity over a sustained period and have exerted influence on the video game industry or on popular culture and society in general."

So yeah, all these Hall of Fame games certainly qualify, and are undoubtedly deserving of such an honor. But such criteria still leads to my third question: when can we expect Robotron to get the recognition it so rightly deserves?