Felicia Day Jokes About New Sitcom & Food Delivery Problems (Emerald City Comic Con)

ECCC 2018: The Magicians' Felicia Day dishes on takeout horrors and dreams up sitcoms

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Syfy Wire Staff
Mar 4, 2018

You may know her from Buffy, The Guild, Geek & Sundry, Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, Adventure Time, Dragon Age: Redemption, Supernatural, and now SYFY’s own The Magicians, but what you didn’t know is that even with all her acting, writing, and producing superpowers, Felicia Day can still have a hard time with takeout.

“Everything has been amazing except the food that I’ve eaten,” Day said of her Emerald City Comic Con experience so far. “I’ve had the worst luck.”

Day even Instagrammed the experience of ordering Thai food that was somehow delivered without utensils. By then, her baby daughter was fast asleep, so she found herself in the dark, desperately trying to use a baby spoon to eat Thai curry out of one of those glasses hotels usually leave by the sink for you to rinse with when you’re brushing your teeth—on the toilet.

As if that wasn’t bizarre enough, the next time she ordered, Day actually saw the delivery girl driving in circles right outside the hotel. So much for GPS telling you that you’ve reached your destination. At least there were forks.

Before even mentioning her role as Poppy on The Magicians, Day, who has an infectious sense of humor, glanced in the mirrored coffee table and noticed how she and correspondents Whitney Moore and Andre Meadows looked like a sitcom waiting to happen. She called it “Party Girl, Introvert, and the Guy Who Knows How to Fix Things” or “Two Guys, a Girl, and a Geek Loft” as a riff on the forgettable ‘90s sitcom Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place, which (if you can remember) starred Nathan Filion before he took the helm as Captain Tight Pants. “Let’s just revive that!” she laughed.

You’ve already seen Day in the last three episodes of The Magicians if you’ve been keeping up. As a huge fan of the books, she loves how Poppy is a character both on the page and onscreen. She even knew Lev Grossman before the TV incarnation was even a thing.

“Many years ago, he interviewed me for Time Magazine about The Guild,” she remembered. “And he was like ‘Oh, I wrote a book, my first novel was called Codex.’”

Grossman gave her a copy, and you could say the rest was magic.