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Logan's James Mangold really really hates post credit scenes

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Feb 3, 2018

Logan director and co-writer James Mangold has plenty to be happy about. His script, co-authored with Scott Frank and Michael Green, with a story by Mangold, is making history right now as the first ever script of a superhero movie to be nominated for an Oscar. Kind of a big deal. In a year with a ton of script blowback (see: "the Snyder cut," see: the 'remove The Last Jedi from the canon' petition), Logan's story has not only been popular with fans, the gosh darn Academy likes it. 

So, what could Mangold be upset about? Post credit sequences. 

Turns out that while many of us are sitting in the theaters patiently awaiting the most reliably easy-to-find Easter eggs of them all, the bonus scenes at the end of the credits, one man is fuming. According to a report by Cinemablend, the writer/ director sounded off full throatedly against bonus scenes at the 2018 Writers Guild Association Beyond Words panel, held in LA this past Thursday.

Get ready for a lot of bleeped out words here. Mangold really detests these scenes. 

Acoording to Cinemablend, here's some of what was said

"The idea of making a movie that would f***ing embarass me, that's part of the anesthetizing of this country or the world. That's further confirming what they already know and tying in with other f***ing products and selling them the next movie while you're making this movie, and kind of all that sh** that I find really f***ing embarassing." 

No, but wait, tell us how you really feel! 

He reportedly continued: 

"Now we've really gotten audiences addicted to a f***ing bonus in the credits...Even if you got 100,000 Twitter addicts who are gambling on what f***ing scene is going to happen after the f***ing credits, it's still cheating. It's just cheating, but there's all sorts of bad habits like that that f***ing horrify me, man, that have become de rigeur in the way we make movies..." 

Well, this writer kinda likes 'em. (And felt that seeing Deathstroke at the end of Justice League was a rare ray of light in that cinematic experience.) But seeing as Mangold's script is having so much traction, and how the new class of edgier superhero films has such popular appeal, we may be on the verge of a whole new subgenre of Marvel films that could do away with them within their own dark universe.