Feige

Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige explains how Star Wars directly influenced the MCU

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Apr 26, 2018

The Marvel Cinematic Universe celebrates its 10-year anniversary this weekend of Avengers: Infinity War. Not only will every single character introduced over the last decade joining the fight against Thanos (Josh Brolin), but the studio also has a swanky new logo that reflects this major milestone. Appearing on The Star Wars Show, Marvel Studios present Kevin Feige unabashedly admitted that the idea for the logo was ripped straight from the 10-year anniversary of Star Wars in 1987.

“That was directly ripped off of my very positive memories of 1987 and Star Wars: The First Ten Years. [It] got me excited as fan to think, well, there’ll be more, must be the first of many," he said. 

Check out the two logos below and compare them for yourself:

10 years

Credit: Lucasfilm and Marvel Studios

Another way in which Star Wars was influenced by the MCU was in its casting. When the early movies like Iron Man, Captain America, and Thor were being made, Feige said they were simply looking for good actors, not major ones. Of course, Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, and Chris Hemsworth are all major movie stars now, but that wasn't the case 10 years ago (with Downey Jr. having some star power, but having fallen off the radar at that time). This phenomenon, shall we call it, was not "dissimilar" to Star Wars, continued Feige, which hired little-known names such as Harrison Ford, Mark Hamill, and Carrie Fisher, who are all household names now. 

Even after Lucasfilm stopped making movies after Return of the Jedi in 1983, Feige still remained an avid Star Wars fan, joking that he had a Sarlaac pit in his backyard while everyone else was sort of moving away from the franchise since there were no new films to keep the momentum of the fan base going. He collected every toy he could, but it was a collection of books from West End Games that really spoke to him.

These publications were for Star Wars: The Roleplaying Game, and while Feige was never much of the D&D type of guy, these books released between 1987 and 1999 really fascinated him because they contained so much supplementary material that you just didn't get in the movies. For example, he was able to learn the names and backstories of all the aliens from the cantina scene in A New Hope, which just blew his mind. So when it came time to lead Marvel Studios years later, he wanted to take a similar approach. 

“If you’re the kind of person [who] wants to see it on opening weekend, our job is to make sure you have a great time," said Feige. "If you wanna see it a second time, our job is to make sure there’s more there. Third, fourth, fifth time? Still more there. And even [then], the deeper you go, there’ll be more things to reward you, and I learned that directly from Star Wars and from those West End sourcebooks.”

Watch the full episode of The Star Wars Show below. Feige's interview begins at 2:43.