Candyman Tony Todd

Report: Get Out's Jordan Peele in talks to produce Candyman remake

Contributed by
Sep 10, 2018

In the wake of Get Out's Oscar-winning success, its writer and director Jordan Peele has indulged in a host of new genre projects, from his next feature Us to his upcoming YouTube anthology Weird City to a reboot of The Twilight Zone. Now, he might be using his horror clout to tackle a new take on a '90s classic: Candyman.

Bloody Disgusting's Brad Miska recently did some digging on the film, which turned 25 last year, and discovered that the rights to Candyman had recently "become available" again. While it's unclear where those rights now sit, Miska did learn through sources he hasn't revealed just yet that Peele is "in talks" to produce a new Candyman film through his Monkeypaw Productions banner. Beyond that, it's not clear what Peele's role would be or how far along this idea is, but if Peele feels passionate enough about it to put his name on it, there's reason to be excited by this news. 

Written and directed by Bernard Rose, adapted from Clive Barker's short story "The Forbidden," Candyman is the story of a grad student (Virginia Madsen) doing research on urban legends who comes across the story of the title character (Tony Todd). According to legend, he was the son of a slave who became a well-known painter and seemingly accepted member of society after the Civil War, only to then be brutally murdered by a mob after having an affair with a white woman. As the student, Helen, quickly discovers, it's much more than a legend, and the Candyman begins appearing and shedding blood after famously being summoned when someone says his name five times.

Rose's film was well-received, and Candyman quickly became a horror video store staple, and remains a favorite among genre fans, though its two sequels — 1995's Farewell to the Flesh and 1999's Day of the Dead — didn't fare as well. 

It's been nearly two decades since a Candyman film was made, but horror fans still remember the franchise fondly, and the social issues at the heart of the story seem like a perfect lure for Peele, who now has a Best Original Screenplay Oscar thanks to his blending of social issues and meaty horror in Get Out. If this happens, it could be one of the most intriguing horror remakes in years. 

What do you think? Would you watch Peele's take on Candyman?