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Seven queer fantasy TV shows that will make you feel a little less alone

Contributed by
Apr 28, 2020

It's a strange new world where social isolation is the norm and many of our relationships now take place virtually. It's been hard on lots of people, but LGBTQ+ folks are vulnerable to compounding factors that make social isolation particularly challenging.

And, of course, those who are already vulnerable within queer communities are even more impacted by these realities, including transgender and nonbinary adults and youth, older LGBTQ+ folks, disabled LGBTQ+ folks, Black and Brown LGBTQ+ folks, working-class LGBTQ+ folks who can't isolate because they’re now considered "essential," and of course, all the folks whose identities encompass all of the above.

As has always been true, however, queer communities are deeply resilient and resourceful, finding ways to triumph and enjoy life even during the worst of times. We're coping with social isolation the best way we know how: hosting online dance parties, creating free hotlines that send encouraging texts to isolated trans folks, keeping sex parties alive virtually, providing mutual aid, and planning for virtual Pride celebrations.

Just reading that list makes me proud of who we are. We are creating community resilience through connection, care, and commitment to one another. And in that same vein, SYFY FANGRRLS has put together a list of seven fantasy TV shows you can stream right now that might make you feel the teensiest bit less alone.

All of the series below feature the superpowers of being LGBTQ+: queer community, queer love, queer friendship, and yes, even queering your own family. We hope these shows will inspire you and keep you company while coping with social isolation.

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Legends of Tomorrow Supernatural crossover

DC's Legends of Tomorrow

Now in its fifth season of pure ridiculousness, DC's Legends of Tomorrow is a show unlike any other. What started as an overwrought time travel show about all the losers who got kicked off of The Flash and Arrow has become a delightful story about chosen family — and a sexy bisexual ship captain named Sara Lance. Listen, if you like powerful women in tight costumes being goofy and queer, then Legends is the show for you.

Legends has so many outright acknowledged and implied queer characters that it's worth watching for that fact alone. What's truly incredible about Legends is the way queer characters are represented: they f***, they kick ass, they help each other, they fight with each other, and they have each other's backs even when it's no fun. Whether they're facing down a time demon (yes, I said time demon) or someone's evil dad who just won't stay dead, Legends is the kind of queer series that will make you laugh a lot, cry a little, and feel like you're hanging out with your own silly queer crew.

Xena: Warrior Princess

Xena: Warrior Princess

Ah, Xena and Gabrielle. Sometimes I just think about these polyamorous, bisexual lovers gallivanting around ancient Greece and sigh a big heavy sigh of gratitude. Sure, technically, Xena and Gabrielle are never a confirmed couple on the series, meaning they never say "WE'RE HERE, WE'RE QUEER," but I mean, they kinda do?

The pilot follows Gabrielle as she rejects heteronormativity and marriage and just so happens to become the wandering bard to a hot AF reformed warrior princess named Xena. And what follows? Um, some baths, some sharing of beds, lots of longing looks, and a whole lot of mutual support and encouragement. If you're particularly in need of not only a break from the state of the world but a jump back to the easy pacing of '90s television, then honey, this is the show for you.

And if that doesn't scratch your itch, make sure to check out Dynamite's Xena comics, which have canonical smooches and love and whatnot.

Black Lightning

Black Lightning

What I really love about Black Lightning is that it's a show about a family of electrokinetic superheroes (and like, the non-powered mom who is just over all this sh**) as they choose to be family no matter what. Jefferson Pierce, aka Black Lightning, used to be a hero back in the day and only becomes one again when things get really bad in Freeland.

Just around that time, his daughter Anissa, a super-hot lesbian who gets to have smoochies onscreen, realizes she has powers. Her younger sister, Jennifer, wants nothing to do with the family legacy but whoopsie doodle, turns out she has powers, too.

Anissa not only accepts and harnesses her powers but becomes a kind of freedom fighter, using her abilities to make her hometown a better, safer place for her neighbors and friends. In many ways, Anissa becomes the conscience for her super-family, pushing them to put the needs of their community above their own safety. She also gets to date cutie pie Grace Choi, who we also cannot get enough of.

Legacies

Legacies

The third series in The Vampire Diaries universe, Legacies follows the teenage kiddos of characters from both the original series and its spinoff, The Originals. Unlike its predecessors, though, Legacies is a very lighthearted show that explores queerness, rejection, and community resilience through supernatural teenagers. The series centers on two very powerful witches and their kinda-sister who is a tri-brid (werewolf-witch-vampire hybrid — it's very silly and verrrry fun).

There are a lot of teenage hijinks, plenty of partner-swapping, and all the melodrama that made the original series so enrapturing. Let's just say: Boarding school + witches, werewolves, and vampires = ermahgad so cute.

To be fair, explicit queer identities mostly take a back seat in this series, but the series will also leave you wondering: is anyone on this show straight? Here's hoping not! (OK, Alaric is probably straight, but then again, he and Damon were preeeeeetty close on The Vampire Diaries.)

Siren

Siren

Did someone say matriarchal, polyamorous, bisexual murder mermaids?

If they did, then they were probably talking about Siren. This gorgeous series takes place in the Pacific Northwest and every episode takes advantage of those sweeping vistas, creating a real sense of the setting and how it impacts the characters. When a crew of fishers accidentally capture a mermaid, they let all hell loose, not just with the federal government who wants to run tests on the fish-people but also with the mermaids who aren't sheepish about doing some serious damage to humans.

One mermaid, Ryn, comes to dry land, assumes a human form (all mermaids can do that), and promptly falls in love with a couple: Ben and Maddie. And then what?! Well, dearest ones, you'll just have to turn into this incredibly progressive Freeform series to find out.

Killjoys

Killjoys

If you missed out on SYFY's Killjoys when it was on air, you are so freaking lucky. You're about to learn about the world of Westerley and beyond and we're just so happy for you.

Killjoys follows Dutch and her buddies John and D'avin Jaqobis as they bounty hunt their way through this space opera. Team Awesome Force, as these badass fighters call themselves, even has a local pub run by Pree, the greatest queer, biracial uncle you didn't know you needed. Oh yeah, and Pree gets to marry his husband ON SCREEN.

Our intrepid heroes come up against formidable baddies including Dutch's mentor/maybe papa Khylen and a very intimidating person called only The Lady. But, the real badass villains are queer power couple Delle Seyah Kendry and Aneela, who have the weirdest, hottest relationship ever.

But here's the thing, no one stays all good or all bad in this series. Characters are complicated, alliances change, and when a sweet little baby is born from a queer AF pregnancy, everyone has to reorient themselves to their new North Star: keeping him safe.

Wynonna Earp

Wynonna Earp

Last and definitely far from least is Wynonna Earp. This weird Western based on the comic book series of the same name follows Wynonna as she inherits the Earp curse and becomes the only thing standing between humanity and a whole buncha revenants. But don't worry, Wynonna doesn't face them alone. She has her little sister Waverly and her girlfriend Nicole Haught, her sometimes-boyfriend Doc, the extremely cute and queer scientist Jeremy, and all the other friends and frenemies she makes along the way.

If you love queer fantasy and haven't seen Wynonna Earp, you're in for quite the treat. Chocked full of humor, unrelenting in its queerness, and centered on the power of one messed-up badass with a magical gun, this series is required viewing.

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