King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
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She-imagined: Sequels we never got

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Jan 19, 2020, 8:38 PM EST (Updated)

In the FANGRRLtopia we're constructing for ourselves throughout the month, every nerdy want we could ever dream of is possible. FANGRRLtopia has no limits, no budgets, no time constraints, no financial losses — or, you know, basically all of the things that so often prevent sequels from ever becoming a reality.

There are so many movies out there that are just waiting for the perfect follow-up, and so when it came time for Team SYFY FANGRRLS to list our picks for the flicks that would get sequels in our ideal world, we jumped at the chance. In no particular order, here are the films that we'd make sure got the continuation they deserved.

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Practical Magic Sandra Bullock Nicole Kidman

Practical Magic (1998)

It has been over twenty years since the Owens women first made Midnight Margaritas while dancing around the kitchen of their beautiful Victoria-era New England home. This house was purpose-built for Practical Magic, but that doesn't stop me dreaming of living there and enjoying this level of multi-generational exuberance. Things take a turn for the sinister after this sequence, but at this moment these women are celebrating their bond and letting loose. A prequel is coming to HBO Max, which is a solid idea, but I would love to see what these characters are up to in the present day. Plus, there is the bonus of Evan Rachel Wood as one of Sally's daughters to contend with. Three generations of witches are reason enough to greenlight this movie. Is the town still accepting of their talents? Is the store a success? Have they brought anyone else back to life? And do they still dress like it's the '90s? This decade has just had a sartorial comeback after all. So many questions and the only way to answer them is with another round of Midnight Margaritas. - Emma Fraser

King Arthur Legend of the Sword hero

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017)

There is a reason we all affectionately refer to Guy Ritchie's King Arthur movie as #TrashKingArthur. It's an excellent romp of a terrible movie, and it is a goddamned travesty that we won't ever get a sequel to this beautiful mess. The original film ends with Arthur becoming King in his own right and unveiling the Round Table to his Knights. It ends with the Mage on a hill, watching curiously. It ends without us having seen Merlin a single time.

I am dying for a sequel that centers the Mage — the single biggest issue with this King Arthur movie is not the plotting or the absurdist pairing that is high fantasy with a Guy Ritchie style guide, but the ridiculous number of women murdered. This guy (lol) threw in not one, but two dead moms before we even got a title card! So, give us a sequel focusing on the best character, the woman Mage who helps Arthur on his quest for Kingdom. (And then, as a helpful tweeter pointed out during a recent rewatch, cast Vinnie Jones as Merlin. It's perfect.) We will get an entire film about the magic side of the story, but bringing back the gift that is Charlie Hunnam as Arthur, and of course Astrid Bergès-Frisbey as the Mage. I need this in my FANGRRLtopia. Please. I beg you. Let me have this. I'll even accept more giant snakes and unnecessary War Elephants if I must. (But no fridging.) - Preeti Chhibber

Beetlejuice

Beetlejuice (1988)

It has been thirty years since the Beetlejuice sequel was first mentioned, but it seems to be stuck in the same afterlife limbo as Barbara and Adam Maitland in Tim Burton's horror comedy. In recent years Michael Keaton, Winona Ryder, and Catherine O'Hara have all voiced their support of this endeavor with Burton's involvement; however, in 2019 the project was no further off the ground. The iconic movie has been turned into a musical, but alas the much-discussed sequel has not made the same leap into existence. There are plenty of reasons to want to see this creative team-up, which has since influenced numerous black-and-white style moments from NYFW to the red carpet. Hopefully one day the stars will align and Warner Bros. will utter the word "Beetlejuice" three times fast. - Emma Fraser

Spy (2015)

Spy (2015)

I will never be over the fact that Melissa McCarthy's absolutely delightful Spy never got a sequel. To this day, I am baffled that it didn't. It was a modest hit and was liked by critics and fans alike. I wanted to go on more adventures with Susan Cooper, damn it! This movie had everything: McCarthy being more than the butt of fat jokes, Rose Byrne as a deliciously evil and profane villain, Jason Statham in increasingly ridiculous disguises, Jude Law nailing the perfect blend of smarmy and handsome. What more do you people want?! I enjoy Paul Feig's movies, I really do, but his follow-ups to Spy were Ghostbusters, A Simple Favor, and Last Christmas, none of which reached the heights of Alison Janney telling Statham to cool it on the vagina slang. I will argue that this film is perfect and bully people into watching it until I die. We deserved at least three sequels. I have to sit through James Bond doing whatever James Bond does ad infinitum, but I never get to see Susan Cooper kick ass while dressed as your eccentric aunt ever again? Absolutely unacceptable. - Alyssa Fikse

GODZILLA-1998-DI-03

Godzilla (1998)

Godzilla is a mess, but it's a lovely mess. No other movie has ever given us anything close to a character like Dr. Niko 'Nick' Tatopoulos, a Broadway-singing NRC scientist who lets a terrible woman play him twice. I haven't even mentioned Crossfit Godzilla that had the same stealth skills as Solid Snake. This Godzilla walked so Jurassic World's Indominus rex could run. There was also a slew of cool toys that went with the movie. Honestly, the biggest reason Godzilla deserved a sequel was so we could have gotten more of those cool toys. Plus the movie ends perfectly for a sequel. I know I can’t be the only one who wanted to see a world overrun by hundreds of Godzillas. Actually, since Matthew Broderick seemed like he wanted to be on a Broadway stage for most of the movie anyway, the sequel could have been that: Godzilla 2, a play. - Stephanie Williams

The Fifth Element (1997)

The Fifth Element (1997)

In a perfect world, we would have a sequel to The Fifth Element, starring Bruce Willis and Milla Jovovich. But that didn't happen, so I'm here to tell you about days of futures spent not creating this movie. That sequel would be called Sixth Element and instead of hinging on an unlikely romance between the supreme being and a taxi cab driver (slash generally cool cat, don't get me wrong), it would be all about Leeloo as a single lady in the world. She doesn't need a man to hold her down! She's got her friends — because friendship is the real sixth element. Think the Sex and the City movie meets Mad Max: Fury Road. She's getting drinks with the gals and talking about her ex, but she's doing it while hacking and slashing her way through her enemies. Um, yeah. I would watch that. - S.E. Fleenor

Batman & Robin (1997)

Batman & Robin (1997)

Batsuit nipples. That's it. That's the entire reason why Batman & Robin deserved a sequel. OK, not the only reason, but seriously a valid and understandable reason. Alicia Silverstone deserved to give a little more of her version of Barbara Wilson/Batgirl. She doesn’t get as much action screen time as Batman or Robin and a sequel could have given us that. The RoseArt brand style installment of the initial Batman movie series would have hopefully leaned into even more of the camp than its predecessor. Do you remember how ridiculously over the top Poison Ivy and Mr. Freeze were? Because I do. I want more of their energy but with someone like Calendar Man or the Mad Hatter. This movie, like Godzilla (1998), had an amazing toy line which should mean an automatic when it comes to giving movies sequels. - Stephanie Williams

Aeon Flux (2005)

Aeon Flux (2005)

The live-action adaptation of Aeon Flux is not particularly well-loved, even though it contained a fun and sexy performance by Charlize Theron. (The source material, however, is a mainstay of nerdom.) So, if you’re going to make a sequel to a movie people don’t care for, it’s time to amp it up. I’m talking bringing on Michael Bay to direct, getting Ryan Reynolds to co-star, bringing Theron back to reprise the role and going big, big, big. Let’s call this sequel Aeon Flex. Following Aeon after the events of the first film, it shows our girl taking on life in the lush and wild untamed world beyond her city’s walls. Except that land isn't nearly as uninhabited as the people of Bregna were led to believe. Alongside the Monicans, Aeon meets the descendants of those who were immune to the 2011 virus and learns that life continues against all odds. We're talking The 100 meets Bumblebee. Aeon Flex will tell a story of survival through explosions, romance, and a whole lot of heart. - S.E. Fleenor

Atomic Blonde

Atomic Blonde (2017)

It's practically criminal that there have been three John Wick movies but only one Atomic Blonde. There's no question that Charlize Theron played Lorraine Broughton, an ass-kicking spy, with grace and skill. Taking us back to the days of the Cold War and the Berlin Wall, there was limited tech, raising the stakes and giving us a better look at the skills and wits spies had to rely on to get themselves out of a sticky situation. The movie wasn't perfect, but it was well-crafted (if a tad confusing) with a plethora of plot twists and double-crosses coming at you from all sides. The fights were down and dirty and brutal and no one went easy on her because she was a girl, which was frankly refreshing to see on screen. We can always use more of that. And that ending? It's begging for a sequel, if only so we can learn more about where Lorraine's loyalties actually lie and how she ended up where she did. Plus, if we get a sequel, it also means we get a second soundtrack, and it better be as incredible as the first. - Sarah Brown

Galaxy Quest

Galaxy Quest (1999)

I'm gonna cheat and say that Galaxy Quest doesn't need a sequel. It needs a prequel called Grabthar's Hammer. Take me back to the '60s when these fine actors were shooting their Trek-esque series. A "malfunction" on set results in our merry band of heroes being transported to an alien city where they must figure out diplomatic relations, romantic entanglements, and all the other hijinks that made the original film a cult classic. When the locals request their help with an invasion by a violent and colonizing force, the cast realizes the malfunction was a set-up to bring these incredible space-faring heroes to help. (And we finally learn who Grabthar is.) Obviously, a lot of tomfoolery will take place. At the end, a la Men in Black, the aliens wipe the actors' minds, knowing they have an important destiny before them, setting up the events of Galaxy Quest while leaving the existing story intact. The casting potential alone makes me wish this was a real prequel. - S.E. Fleenor

Constantine (2005)

Constantine (2005)

It's been 15 years since Constantine hit theaters, and honestly, we're overdue for a sequel to this movie. A bit before the superhero craze swept the nation (and the box office), Keanu Reeves tackled the role of John Constantine from DC Comics. And despite the comics version being a blonde Brit in a trench coat, Keanu embodied the role of the snarky, cynical, and chainsmoking occult detective. Sure, Constantine wasn't perfect, it had a muddled plot, and the effects tended towards the cheesier side, but that gives the sequel room for improvement. Superheroes are all the rage right now, and with a version of Constantine popping up in the DCTV universe, audiences have a better understanding of the character and his motivations. And with sequels to both The Matrix and Bill and Ted in the works, Keanu is clearly onboard with revisiting long-ago roles. Let's bring John Constantine back to take on the newest evils and continue his search for salvation. - Sarah Brown

Jupiter Ascending (2015)

Jupiter Ascending (2015)

Jupiter Ascending is a gorgeous mess of a movie that I absolutely adore. Released right around the same time I started my own transition, and after both Wachowskis had begun theirs, I can't help but view it as a love letter to the coming out process, to finding out the sheer madness of the universe around you and that you've got a whole other place in the world than the one you were raised in. It has a sublimely original bit of universe building, including an absurdly placed, Douglas Adams-y government paperwork sequence that feels almost dropped in from another movie while also making we want to know everything about it. I also submit that for all the mockery it receives for things like Channing Tatum's dog-spliced soldier boy or bees recognizing royalty, none of these things are more silly than things wholly embraced by other space opera franchises, like a gun-toting foul-mouthed space raccoon or a bumbling British protocol droid. But if I were given the power to expand Jupiter out into more films, the thing I'd do is split the first movie into two. Diving the movie up into two parts might have been a risky move for an uncertain attempt to launch a new franchise, but it may have given the expansive world more space to breathe, and certainly would've made the story feel less rushed. And considering that the movie has two third acts, it feels like this is exactly what should have happened to begin with. - Riley Silverman

The VVitch

The VVitch (2016)

The VVitch is the best for many reasons, not the least of which being that it gave us the most preferable eventuality for women in the 1600s — joining a coven and reigning terror on the countryside that has wronged you. The only downside? We were so focused on Thomasin's journey through misery that we didn't really get to see too much of the reigning havoc with a coven part. That's why my sequel will focus on Thomasin after she leaves her family to die by their own evil creation, when she becomes BFFs with the other girls from the coven and, you know what, maybe destroys a village or two. Let's face it, she's earned the chance to unwind, and kidnapping children and inflicting multiple plagues on the countryside might just be the way for her to finally find her voice and come into her own as an empowered woman. Also, what was up with that witch in the woods? Let's hang out with her for a movie. Let's see what she's about. - Sara Century

Salt (2010)

Salt (2010)

It has been nearly 10 years since Angelina Jolie starred as the titular spy, in a movie that was famously set to star Tom Cruise. Rewritten with a female protagonist, Salt is far from perfect, but the bones of a good spy franchise are there. Clunky storytelling aside, Jolie nails both the action scenes and the emotional vulnerability, as well as changing up her look in order to complete her mission. Sure, there are various plot holes and ludicrous leaps are made to connect the dots, however, most movies in this particular genre tend to fall into the same traps. It is also notable that James Bond and Mission: Impossible continue to thrive, whereas female-fronted covert agent projects tend to fall at the first hurdle. Yes, Black Widow is coming out this year but how long did it take for this to get made? Salt ends with a very clear sign that a sequel was on the cards and while the whole Russian agent narrative probably seemed passé in 2010, this particular narrative made an IRL comeback during this decade. What better time to bring back Jolie in full ass-kicking mode as triple agent Evelyn Salt? There are definitely some matters that need her attention. - Emma Fraser

Jennifer's Body

Jennifer's Body (2009)

It's no secret that Jennifer’s Body has been gaining a second life for horror fans that might have overlooked it the first time around. It also happens to be a rare horror film that leaves the door wide open for a sequel and then never took it back up. The first movie was all about toxicity in female friendships and how that interacts with body image and romantic relationships, but our protagonist Needy spent that whole first round struggling to get out of Jennifer's shadow. In her own words, she says she feels like she's changed into a different person, so watching her come into her own as a demi-demon is the kind of premise that sounds like it was created with me in mind, only partially because I’m the one who came up with it just now. Jennifer's Body deserves the recent attention it's gotten, but with the knowledge of the critical panning the first one got a sequel would be the perfect venue to address the meta-commentary around the film. - Sara Century

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015)

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015)

At SYFY FANGRRLS, Guy Ritchie's The Man from U.N.C.L.E. is beloved and there is a good reason why we can't stop dreaming of a sequel. Not only is the '60s-set reboot incredibly fun, but it doesn't feel like any of the other spy movies that are currently in circulation. There is no attempt at making it gritty, instead, the story revels in fabulous costumes of the era, gadgets, and high-speed chases. The casting of the core trio is resplendent with Alicia Vikander, Henry Cavill, and Armie Hammer having strong throuple chemistry. Elizabeth Debicki made an excellent villain and there are plenty of options to take over the "bad guy" role, whether Tessa Thompson, Henry Golding or Mads Mikkelsen (and these are just the first casting ideas I thought of). Briefly mention this movie on Twitter and you are met with an outpouring of love: a sequel is exactly what the world needs right now. - Emma Fraser

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