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Solo: A Star Wars Story's many excellent pop culture Easter eggs

Contributed by
May 26, 2018

What would a large franchise movie be without a number of esoteric easter eggs to find? Though Solo: A Star Wars Story doesn’t pack as many into its running time as Ready Player One, it does find the right places to drop some in and not be too distracting. Here’s a roundup of those we noticed.

**Spoiler Warning: Obviously, there are spoilers for Solo: A Star Wars Story below**

THE FERTILITY IDOL

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Indiana Jones movies have had plenty of references to Star Wars in them, from Artoo and Threepio carved in hieroglyphics in the chamber of the Ark to the Club Obi-Wan in Temple of Doom, but legitimate nods to Indiana Jones from Star Wars have been fewer and farther between. Now we know that Dryden Vos must be a client of Belloq’s because in his office, displayed prominently, is the fertility idol from Raiders of the Lost Ark.

VCX-100

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During the film, Han offers up an imaginary VCX-100 as a wager against the Millennium Falcon in a sabacc game. For those familiar with makes and models of Star Wars ships, they will recognize a VCX-100 as the same type of ship that Hera Syndulla captains. This is the second Star Wars standalone film in a row that includes some mention or glimpse of the ship. In Rogue One, the Ghost fought at the battle of Scarif. 

NEEDLES

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When Han Solo needs to pull a ridiculous stunt during the Kessel Run, he falls back on a move that fans of Back to the Future might recognize, and he even credits it to an old street-racing friend named Needles back home on Corellia. This was a reference to Flea’s character in the Back to the Future films, a determined street racer who continues to challenge Marty McFly.

BLACK SPIRE STATION

L3-37 casually mentions that without her, Lando couldn’t get from “here to Black Spire Station,” which is a reference to the new Star Wars land currently under construction at Galaxy’s Edge in the Disney parks. Black Spire Station is located on Batuu, where droid parts could be bought or sold. Presumably we’ll get a glimpse of it in person next year when the park opens. 

AV-21s

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When trying to convince everyone of his criminal credentials, Han mentions that he was boosting AV-21s on the streets of Corellia since he was 10 years old. AV-21s were two-person speeders originally designed and seen in the original Star Wars Galaxies MMORPG. They were rare in the game and required characters to obtain parts from the “Corellian Corvette” missions and cost upward of 2 million credits.

BOSSK

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The Trandoshan Bounty Hunter made his first appearance in The Empire Strikes Back and has come back for many appearances in Star Wars: The Clone Wars, but he warrants a mention from Val in the film. When rattling off the names of people more reliable than Han and Chewie they could hire, Bossk makes the cut.

LADY PROXIMA

The voice of Lady Proxima is itself a nod to a previous Lawrence Kasdan film. She’s voiced by the legendary character actor Linda Hunt. Hunt played Stella, the madam in Silverado, which is the western film written and directed by Lawrence Kasdan. 

LANDO'S DISGUISE

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It turns out Lando’s skiff guard disguise has been on the Millennium Falcon for years before Lando has need of it to infiltrate Jabba’s palace more than a decade later to rescue Han. Here we see Tobias Beckett sport the costume to infiltrate Kessel. If you’re a smuggler apt to bluff your way through situations, it makes sense to keep a costume closet aboard your ship.

THE DANCING GODDESS

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Another reference hidden deep in Dryden Vos’s office is the Statue of the Dancing Goddess. This green statue and nod to noir films first appeared in Issue #79 of the original run of Marvel Star Wars comics and was a long-sought prize in the criminal underworld throughout the old expanded universe. In that Legends timeline, it was owned at various times by Xisor, Jabba the Hutt, and others. In the canon timeline, however, the Maltese Falcon-esque prize won’t be appearing again anytime soon. Dryden shattered it in his fight with Han and Qi’ra.

PORTIONS

In the opening of the film, you can hear the scumrats of Corellia under Lady Proxima’s “protection” argue about how many portions they might receive for items they stole. This is a clear echo of Rey’s existence on Jakku. It makes one realize how much of himself Han saw in Rey in The Force Awakens

THE CARIDA ACADEMY

After joining up, Han is sent to the Imperial Academy on Carida, where he is promptly tossed out of flight training for not following orders. The Academy on Carida was first mentioned in the novel Tarkin and was a facility designed to train officers in all branches of the Imperial armed forces. 

THE IMPERIAL MARCH

The Imperial March is one of the most iconic pieces of Star Wars music, but who knew it was so popular among the Empire itself? In Solo: A Star Wars Story, we hear it used in the Empire’s recruitment ads, but this isn’t the first time we’ve heard it played in-universe. In Star Wars Rebels, a similar rendition is played during the Empire Day parade on Lothal. 

SCARIF

Scarif is a planet that Qi’ra name-drops as one of the few places where one might find as much refined hyperfuel as they need to satisfy the requirements of their heist. You’ll remember Scarif as the site of the climactic battle at the end of Rogue One, home to the Citadel Archive that houses the original engineering plans for the first dreaded Death Star. 

"TWO TUBES"

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Edrio "Two Tubes" and his eggmate Benthic were Tognath mercenaries who worked for Saw Gerrera on Jedha. They were featured prominently in Rogue One, and one of them makes an appearance in Enfys Nest’s Cloud Rider gang. At what point they make it to work for Saw as a partisan is anyone’s guess, but we know some of the seeds of Rebellion were planted right here in Solo

CLOUD RIDERS

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Enfys Nest’s gang is a swoop flying band of marauders who refer to themselves as Cloud Riders. The name Cloud Riders actually originated in the old Marvel Comics series that was originally produced to follow up the movie adaptation in 1977. The Cloud Riders in that appearance were more like the bandits in Seven Samurai, and a group of villagers hired Han and a motley crew of heroes to defend them against their attack. Seeing Han tangle with a swoop gang in a film was a dream come true for fans of the original comics.