How The Invisible Man Flips The Dark Universe On Its Head | SYFY WIRE

How The Invisible Man flips the Dark Universe on its head

Contributed by
Feb 18, 2020, 12:43 PM EST (Updated)

The Invisible Man is here. Can you see him?

In this modern retelling of the classic H.G. Wells tale, Elisabeth Moss plays Cecilia, a woman who leaves her toxic relationship and takes refuge with her friend and his daughter (played by Aldis Hodge and Storm Reid). But then her ex, Adrian (Oliver Jackson-Cohen), kills himself, leaving his mass fortune to Cecilia if she can prove she is of sound mind. Of course, it's not quite that easy when the Invisible Man enters the picture.

Director Leigh Whannell says The Invisible Man wasn't in his sights as his next project, but it struck a chord. "As soon as it was suggested to me I started thinking about how I would do it and it kind of took root in my body like a virus. I couldn't stop thinking about it, I was lying awake at night," he said. "My whole idea was: approach the story from the point of view of the victim. Traditionally the Invisible Man story, you know the novel and the 1933 film, it's all about the scientist and he's the lead character and he's going insane and he's dealing with it. I felt like, that's a great story but that's not what would make it scary for me. What would be scary would be to see the film through the eyes of the  person being hunted by the Invisble Man and never knowing, 'Is he in the room right now? Is he here?'" Correct, that's very terrifying!

But like Whannell said, this iteration of the story is about Cecilia's experience trying to come to grips with not only the aftermath of this toxic relationship, but the fact that she is being haunted by a man no one else sees or believes.

"I wanted to bring Cecilia on a real journey, that she is not the person she used to be before she got into this relationship with Adrian," said Moss. "She's damaged and vulnerable and fragile and through the journey of the film finds a strength and gets something back that she needed. And for me, it's if you can take somebody on that journey if you can show somebody, 'I know you've been through something. I know you feel different. I know you don't think you can do this anymore, but we're going to take you all the way to the bottom and come back up and also entertain them and also scare the bejesus out of them, then that's something, I feel like I've done my job."

Check out the video below to get the lowdown on The Invisible Man from Elisabeth Moss, Aldis Hodge, Leigh Whannell, and Storm Reid.

The Invisible Man opens on February 28.

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