Paper Girls #1 Image Comics by Cliff Chiang
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Paper Girls #1 artwork by Cliff Chiang (Credit: Image Comics via Comixology)

Amazon Studios prints up an order for Paper Girls series based on Image Comic

Contributed by
Jul 11, 2019

Amazon Studios has given a series commitment to the popular Image comic Paper Girls by acclaimed author Brian K. Vaughan and artist Cliff Chiang.

According to Deadline, which first reported the news, the series — which Image once described as "Stand By Me meets War of the Worlds" — was negotiated as part of a deal with Legendary Entertainment and production company Plan B.

Writer Stephany Folsom (Toy Story 4) will adapt the comic. Folsom, Vaughan, and Plan B will all serve as executive producers. The Amazon Studios commitment is part of Vaughan's multi-year deal with Legendary Entertainment. Another comic by Vaughan is currently in development for FX; the TV adaptation Y: The Last Man is slated for a 2020 release, though its development cycle has had some unexpected hiccups (like the series losing its showrunners).

Vaughn (Saga) created Paper Girls in 2015 along with artist Chiang (Wonder Woman). The series, which will end its run with the upcoming Issue #30, is centered on four 12-year-old newspaper delivery girls (Erin, MacKenzie, KJ, and Tiffany) in the boring fictional suburb of Stony Stream ... well, boring until the kids get caught in the middle of warring time travelers. Set in 1988, the comic is all about those first crushes, first jobs, and, you know, time displacement.

Amazon Studios is no doubt eager to capitalize on the nostalgic horror/sci-fi genre, a la Netflix's Stranger Things. Season 3 of the hit show has already helped Netflix shatter viewership records, despite just being released on July 4. Could Paper Girls be Amazon's ticket to that golden 1980s nostalgia paradise? We'll just have to wait and see!

Paper Girls — colored by Matt Wilson, with lettering by Jared K. Fletcher and flatting by Dee Cunniffe — has garnered both critical and commercial acclaim, including two Eisner Awards in 2016. What has sustained the series throughout the past 30 issues has been its unsanitized look at growing up, peer groups, and how we learn about who we are, all held together by solid sci-fi storytelling.

Can someone from the future please tell us when we can watch this series? Okay. Fine, we'll be patient ... for now.


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